HSI Services, Inc. has 20+ years of experience in water management

Mine Reclamation and Dewatering

Mine Reclamation and Dewatering

Mine Reclamation and Dewatering

Mining makes up a large part of our industry here in America. Natural gas, petroleum, and coal, sulfur, and gravel are all examples of minerals and resources we mined in our country. Mines prove useful from a few years to a few decades, but what happens after a mine is closed? Federal laws and state agencies have regulations on the correct way to close, decommission, and remediate a mine. Click To Tweet Mine reclamation is a process that all mines must undertake when they are no longer functioning.

Mine Closure & Reclamation

It might not surprise you, but properly closing up a mine is a time-consuming process and could take years to complete. This is especially true if long-term water treatment or monitoring is necessary. When closing a mine, the following steps need to be taken:

  • Shutting Down: Once all production has ended, contractors will remain to remove equipment and shut down operations.
  • Decommissioning: Parts and equipment are removed and cleaned, pipelines are drained, structures and buildings are demolished, and waste is removed from the site. 
  • Reclamation/Remediation: This long process is designed to return the land to a satisfactory standard and to ensure that close by water sources have acceptable water quality. Reclamation workers need to remove hazardous materials from the site, as well as surrounding trees, grasses, and topsoil.
  • Post-Closure: After closing, continuous monitoring needs to be in place to show whether reclamation processes were successful. This long-term maintenance process might involve treatment of mine discharge water, and occasional monitoring of the effects of the residues left behind.

 

Mine Dewatering

As one would imagine, many mines are below the groundwater level and they can affect groundwater if not properly treated. These mines need to be dewatered in order to prevent operational problems or contaminated water. For a successful mine dewatering operation, it is imperative to set in place groundwater control strategies like pit or mine pumping, and perimeter dewatering to catch lateral groundwater flow to lower levels. Utilizing an Aqua–Barrier® inflatable cofferdam can make your mine dewatering safer, as well as more cost-effective.

Decommissioned Mines and Reclamation Programs

Mine reclamation can be easier with the proper tools like mini-excavators, dredgers, and inflatable cofferdams, especially when you are working below groundwater level. It takes a lot of work and planning to properly decommission a mine, so make sure to learn and follow your state and federal laws pertaining to the process.

Contact us to learn more about mine reclamation and dewatering.

6 Ways to Cut Down Your Construction Costs

6 Ways to Cut Down Your Construction Costs

Operating a construction business costs money, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t ways to cut costs. With careful planning and action, you can also help eliminate waste, decrease negative environmental impact, and boost your bottom line. Cutting costs doesn’t mean you have to give up quality. Click To Tweet

Cutting Construction Costs

Everyone wants to make the most money possible when they own a company, and the construction business is no different. Here are some top ways you can help cut down your construction costs without sacrificing a thing.

1) Create a Master Plan

Without a solid master plan, there is a higher likelihood that there will unnecessary spending. Make sure your plan includes management for time, costs, and quality, as well as contracts, safety, scope and more. A reliable project manager should monitor this plan and make sure it is updated through the entire construction process.

2) Hire Multi-Purpose Employees

It can be difficult to find good help, but it is important to find quality workers if you are looking to cut construction costs. Try to hire employees who have more than one skill and can be used in a myriad of areas.

3) Better Contract Negotiation

To help lessen the costs of supplies and other expenses, it is imperative you create good relationships with your vendors and negotiate contracts and prices. A long-term relationship can help you land discounts on supplies and services.

4) Reuse & Recycle

According to the EPA, more than 534 tons of construction debris end up in our landfill each year. By sticking to your master plan and not over-purchasing supplies, you can help cut back on waste. Try to find tools and supplies that are reusable or recyclable, like an inflatable cofferdam, to help cut costs, and also decrease your environmental impact.

5) Quality Tools & Supplies

Investing in quality tools and supplies will make a huge difference in your construction costs. If you purchase cheap tools, you will be replacing them and spending more money in the long run. For example, instead of wasting money on time-consuming sandbags for a dewatering project, an Aqua-Barrier® cofferdam is not only reusable, but less time consuming, therefore cuts down on manpower, as well as being environmentally friendly.

6) Get High-Tech

While new technology might seem expensive at first, it can definitely cut construction costs in the long-term. There are so many new technologies available to help you streamline your construction projects so you can get the job done faster.

Construction Costs & Your Bottom Line

Cutting the high costs of construction can be done with proper planning, the right tools, and by following the above tips. Not only will you be helping boost your company’s bottom line, but also making a difference for our environment, too!

To learn more about how you can cut construction costs and boost your bottom line, Contact Us.

Construction Dewatering: A Project Manager’s Basic Checklist

Construction Dewatering: A Project Manager’s Basic Checklist

Managing any construction project can be challenging, but especially when the project needs construction site dewatering. With proper planning and a basic checklist, you can make sure that your construction dewatering project happens successfully. Click To Tweet

Checklist for Construction Dewatering Projects

Before you begin your construction dewatering project, it is imperative you have a solid plan and checklist to help you stay on task, keep workers safe, and ensure that you have all the proper equipment to get the job done. Here are some great tips on what to include in your basic checklist:

Formal Procedure Plan

As mentioned, a solid plan is the first step in a successful dewatering project. This formal procedure plan should include procedure requirements, relevant laws and regulations, as well as the concept design, groundwater monitoring documents, and anything else required for the project.

Risk Assessment

Risk assessment is an important part of the dewatering construction process and should be factored in for every dewatering project. A risk assessment will identify any existing or potential adverse effects to the environment or humans in the area or on the project. Risk identification and analysis is vital to keeping people, animals, and the environment safe.

Training Requirements

With construction dewatering being riskier and involved than a normal construction project, it is necessary to have a proper training plan in place and implemented in order to ensure the safety of those working on the site.

Dewatering Methods & Equipment

There are multiple methods of dewatering and it is best to choose the one that best fits your construction dewatering project. Some of the most commonly used equipment in dewatering are sump pumps and the Aqua-Barrier® inflatable cofferdams. Cofferdams are less time-consuming and expensive than the old-fashioned sandbag method used years ago. An inflatable cofferdam is instrumental in attaining a dry work site and is 3-5 times faster than other methods.

Disposal Options

Along with having a proper plan, a well-trained team, and the best equipment for the job, it is also important to understand which disposal options are available. Make sure to know what regulations require to determine the best disposal route.

Construction Dewatering Done Right

By making and sticking to a solid checklist, your dewatering project can happen without a hitch. Monitoring your plan and staying in communication with all involved will make sure your construction dewatering project is successful and safe for all involved.

To learn more about creating a basic checklist for your next dewatering project, Contact Us.

The Top 6 Uses For a Cofferdam

The Top 6 Uses For a Cofferdam

A cofferdam is an essential tool for any project that requires dewatering. With so many advantages to this versatile tool, there’s no reason not to give it a try on your next project. If you need to keep a job site dry, a cofferdam is your best option. Providing a portable dam is more effective, environmentally friendly, and less time-consuming than sandbags or other methods. Click To Tweet

Top Uses for a Cofferdam

Cofferdams have been around for some time now, and have been used for many impressive projects in the United States, such as the repair of the U.S.S. North Carolina and the construction of the Tappan Zee Bridge in New York City. Below are seven of the top uses for a cofferdam and how they might assist you on your next dewatering project.

1) Boat Ramp Construction & Repair

Whether you are building a new boat ramp or repairing an existing one, an inflatable cofferdam is a perfect way to get the water out of your work site.

2) Concrete Repair

Working on submerged concrete, like with canals and culverts, can prove a daunting task. An Aqua-Barrier® cofferdam is a safe and effective way to get your area dry and ready for repairs.

3) Pipeline Construction

Pipeline construction and inspections are another great use for a cofferdam, giving contractors the dry area they need for proper construction and repairs.

4) Sediment Control

Using silt barriers and flotation devices for sediment control are outdated. An inflatable cofferdam is faster and more efficient with its easy install and removal.

5) Shoreline Restoration

Our shorelines play a vital role in the ecological balance of our environment. A cofferdam is the perfect environmentally friendly solution to shoreline restoration.

6) Pool & Water Park Maintenance

A cofferdam is a perfect way to make pool or water park maintenance without having to close down entirely! The Aqua-Barrier® cofferdam can restrict water to one side of the pool or swimming area while repairs are being made.

Cofferdams: For All Your Dewatering Needs

Cofferdams are portable dams that are perfect for a variety of dewatering needs. Their internal baffle makes them strong and reusable, saving you time, money, and manpower. Stop working extra hard with cumbersome sandbags and other outdated watering methods and switch to a more reliable and convenient method of dewatering with an Aqua-Barrier® cofferdam.

To learn more about the top uses for a cofferdam, Contact Us.

Top 4 Dewatering Myths Debunked

Top 4 Dewatering Myths Debunked

Dewatering for a construction project might have been arduous and time-consuming in the past, but a lot has changed over the years making these projects easier and safer than ever. In fact, many old dewatering practices have been abandoned, meaning that sticking with them can end up costing you time and money. Outdated practices or myths about dewatering should be addressed and eliminated to save your project time and money! Click To Tweet

Debunking Dewatering Myths

With new technology, dewatering is simpler and more cost-effective than in previous years. In fact, many construction dewatering myths are no longer valid. Here are three dewatering myths that have been debunked with the evolution of the cofferdam.

1) Earthen Dams Are Best

Earthen dams have been used for thousands of years and were once thought to be the best option for a dewatering project. This no longer holds true, because earthen dams are outdated and likely to fail or be unsafe. Earthen dams are made of dirt, making their structure weak. This can cause the dirt dam to fail when sloughing or erosion occurs. An inflatable cofferdam lets you work with more stability and control and take minimal manpower to install.

2) Drain the Entire Pool

The myth that to repair a pool you must drain the entire thing is incorrect if you have an Aqua Barrier® inflatable dam. Inflatable water dams allow you to dewater a section of the pool for repairs, rather than draining the entire pool. The inflatable water dam is actually filled with pool water, and will conform to your pool’s shape, forming a seal. When the work is complete, the water is drained back into the pool, conserving water.

3) Sandbags Are Ideal

Sandbags have their place in construction but in most cases, the Aqua Barrier® Cofferdam will get you better results with far less prep time. To achieve a 100 foot long x 8 foot high sandbag wall requires more than 50,000 sandbags, adding time and effort from your employees. Sandbags also require special disposal, resulting in extra cost. An inflatable water dam requires no heavy lifting and equipment, and it is reusable and eco-friendly.

4) Inflatable Dams are Expensive

Think an inflatable cofferdam will be too expensive? Try the Cofferdam Cost Evaluator. This great tool allows you to get your costs before making your purchase. It also allows you to compare the inflatable cofferdam price to that of sheet piling or earthen dams. You will soon see that the inflatable dam wins out in the end, not only with ease of function, cost-effectiveness, but it is reusable and therefore, environmentally safe.

Dewatering Myths Debunked by the Aqua-Barrier Cofferdam

With the Aqua-Barrier cofferdam, dewatering projects have never been easier or more cost-effective. With inflatable cofferdams, you will cut down on post-work clean-up, reduce workers comp claims for heavy lifting, and also reduce installation and removal time, too.

To learn more about how other dewatering myths have been debunked by inflatable water dams, Contact Us.